Symptoms of Agoraphobia with Panic Disorder

Agoraphobia is commonly known as the fear of leaving one’s home, but it truly a fear open spaces or places where someone feels that they will not be able to easily escape harm. This is why many agoraphobics become afraid to leave their homes; when the disorder becomes extremely intense and prominent, the individual might not feel safe anywhere except in this small amount of space that they can control.

According to the NLM, “The exact cause of agoraphobia is unknown.” While the condition can entail either agoraphobia alone or the symptoms of such along with panic disorder, the latter can often cause the former. “Agoraphobia sometimes occurs when a person has had a panic attack and begins to fear situations that might lead to another panic attack.”

While issues of agoraphobia with panic disorder are often ignored until they become intense, there are ways that you can look for symptoms of this disorder. Seeking formal treatment for your condition is usually necessary, especially counseling in order to break down the fear of what you cannot control.

We can help you find treatment for agoraphobia. Call toll free to find help today.

Psychological Symptoms of Agoraphobia with Panic Disorder

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Agoraphobia is a mental health condition in which a person fears open spaces, and stays mostly in their home because of it.

Agoraphobia can occur alone, but the symptoms of such will be the same whether it has built from panic disorder or not. The NLM lists some of the psychological symptoms of the two disorders occurring together, including:

  • Being afraid of spending time alone
  • Being afraid of places where you cannot escape easily
    • This may include crowds, bridges, or even open spaces if there is no sign of help or comfort nearby.
  • Being extremely dependent on others
    • You may ask others to go out and get things for you, stay with you at all times, or even in the most minor cases, stick extremely close to someone you know when you are in a place where you feel uncomfortable (standing close, needing them to hold your hand, etc.).
    • This last issue can build into more intensive agoraphobia the longer it goes on.
  • Feeling separated from other people
    • This feeling will likely bother you, but you will not end the behavior which separates you from them (often because you will feel unable to).
  • Feeling helpless constantly
  • Feeling that your body isn’t real
  • Feeling that the environment around you is not real
    • These delusions strongly point to the fact that you are in need of intensive therapy in order to work through your agoraphobia.
  • Becoming very angry or agitated over little things, out of nowhere; having a strong and unpredictable temper
  • Staying in the house for long periods of time

A person can experience symptoms of agoraphobia with or without panic disorder, just as they can experience panic disorder without agoraphobia. But often these two conditions occur together as the individual’s fears make it impossible for them to go out into any place where they might feel unsafe or open to the possibility of a panic attack. This condition is usually more intense than either of the other two experienced alone because of the physical and mental aspects of their joint symptoms.

Agoraphobia is commonly known as the fear of leaving one’s home, but it truly a fear open spaces or places where someone feels that they will not be able to easily escape harm. This is why many agoraphobics become afraid to leave their homes; when the disorder becomes extremely intense and prominent, the individual might not feel safe anywhere except in this small amount of space that they can control.

According to the NLM, “The exact cause of agoraphobia is unknown.” While the condition can entail either agoraphobia alone or the symptoms of such along with panic disorder, the latter can often cause the former. “Agoraphobia sometimes occurs when a person has had a panic attack and begins to fear situations that might lead to another panic attack.”

While issues of agoraphobia with panic disorder are often ignored until they become intense, there are ways that you can look for symptoms of this disorder. Seeking formal treatment for your condition is usually necessary, especially counseling in order to break down the fear of what you cannot control. We can help you find that treatment. Call toll free for help today.

Psychological Symptoms of Agoraphobia with Panic Disorder

Agoraphobia can occur alone, but the symptoms of such will be the same whether it has built from panic disorder or not. The NLM lists some of the psychological symptoms of the two disorders occurring together, including:

  • Being afraid of spending time alone
  • Being afraid of places where you cannot escape easily
    • This may include crowds, bridges, or even open spaces if there is no sign of help or comfort nearby.
  • Being extremely dependent on others
    • You may ask others to go out and get things for you, stay with you at all times, or even in the most minor cases, stick extremely close to someone you know when you are in a place where you feel uncomfortable (standing close, needing them to hold your hand, etc.).
    • This last issue can build into more intensive agoraphobia the longer it goes on.
  • Feeling separated from other people
    • This feeling will likely bother you, but you will not end the behavior which separates you from them (often because you will feel unable to).
  • Feeling helpless constantly
  • Feeling that your body isn’t real
  • Feeling that the environment around you is not real
    • These delusions strongly point to the fact that you are in need of intensive therapy in order to work through your agoraphobia.
  • Becoming very angry or agitated over little things, out of nowhere; having a strong and unpredictable temper
  • Staying in the house for long periods of time

A person can experience symptoms of agoraphobia with or without panic disorder, just as they can experience panic disorder without agoraphobia. But often these two conditions occur together as the individual’s fears make it impossible for them to go out into any place where they might feel unsafe or open to the possibility of a panic attack. This condition is usually more intense than either of the other two experienced alone because of the physical and mental aspects of their joint symptoms.

Know that you do not have to struggle with agoraphobia alone. Call for help today.

Caring specialists are available right now to help you find a treatment solution that’s right for you. Don’t wait... CALL NOW!

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